THE MAGIC OF CHRISTMAS

By Barbara Matias

By this time, some of us already carry lists in our pockets.

Lists of what we need. Lists of what we want. Lists of what we need to offer. Lists of what we want to receive.

We leaf through catalogues, looking for the best promotions and then we analyze the quality/price.

Flickr Dawn Ashley - flickr.com/dawnashley

Flickr Dawn Ashley – flickr.com/dawnashley

The television occupies the intervals with advertisements for toys, perfumes and watches.

The glow of street lights distracts both the kids and the whole family.

At home, we lift up the pines, garnish them and look at them as a shortcut to Lapland.

We look for cod and turkey at the supermarkets.

The endless queues in stores remind even the most distracted that Christmas is here.

At 23 years old I no longer live this holiday season with the same animation.

As a child I used to wait for Santa far more than the gift he brought. But my parents didn’t realize that.

For me, Christmas was a date on the calendar marked down for magic to happen.

The day that opens our smiles and brings the sparkle that we have within us to our eyes.

The day that Santa arrives with our dreams in a red bag. Dreams that materialize one by one as we open them.

Therefore I kept the packages of gifts and I was careful with them. Those packages left a trail of magic and, sooner or later, I would be able to follow it.

Over the years, I’ve realized that the magic of Christmas has lost out to consumerism.

It is believed that money buys magic and it couldn’t be more wrong.

So, from year to year, I was enticed to earn money in advance if I wanted to “get” the magic of December 24th.

Flickr: Christina Rutz flickr.com/paparutzi

Flickr: Christina Rutz flickr.com/paparutzi

At a time when the idea of gathering the whole family is changing, we divide our happiness and it gets weaker.

Some loved ones are away; the others miss those who are not here. And some of them have already gone, which takes away our happiness and leaves sorrow in our hearts.

With age also came the responsibility to look around ourselves. In this period, the news about those who have no one on the 24th multiplies. Have no home to put the pine, no chimney where Santa can enter. Have no money to buy the magic, no pockets to put the lists.

With age came the notion that Christmas and magic lost each other when we were kids and it’s up to us to get the two back.

Christmas and magic should be spread by us, in some way, over 365 days a year and to all the people that cross our path in all corners of life.

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